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#81 laming

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Posted 31 July 2005 - 06:48 AM

SW said:

> Andre: listen to your good spouse.

On which subject? She has much to say about all of it! (Only kidding.)

> But, if you find the time to dribble out to your loyal fans these 1890 wonders, we would
> be ever so grateful.

Aw, you know me: "Talk About It Ming". Not much way of escaping my verbosity!

> This theme is perfect - little engines, steep grades, raw little towns.

Well, that's the part of Ozark TOC that's was drawing me in, even back in my model RR days! (First begin to tinker with HO models and TOC back in the early 80's.)

> Your beta count should be low too because all of the hills were bare of trees.
> Nothing but stumps and brush.

Well, there is a lot of accuracy in the bare mountains statement. Much of the timber in proximity to the roadbed was hasitly chopped into ties for railroad construction. I realize I'll need to come up with some form of "scrubble" terrtex to carry that impression off. Need to address that soon enough.

> I've chattered on enough in this forum about the wonders of Ozark TOC, so I'll let it rest.

Nah, no need to give it rest. This is the place to share your enthusiasm!

#82 chripsch

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Posted 31 July 2005 - 09:16 AM

Hi Andre!

Nice Turntable laugh.gif Lets turn our 2-8-0 and steam on to serve the mines! Looking forward seeing to grow your route!Go on this way!

Best regards,

Christian

#83 chripsch

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Posted 03 August 2005 - 05:17 AM

Hi Andre!

Some new goodies for us to see?

Regards,

Christian

#84 laming

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Posted 03 August 2005 - 08:38 AM

Hi Christian!

Alas, the past couple days or so have been quite full vocationally and I haven't been able to find the time to be in RE and/or TSM. So, except for a building or two along with some other odds and ends, not much progress to report.

On the upside: Needed research has begun that will be used to make the decisions needed for a roster that is historically appropriate for the region.

Andre

#85 chripsch

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Posted 03 August 2005 - 09:45 AM

Hi Andre!

Seems you`re always busy and a never resting man wink.gif
But: Seems that your new Ozar-route is slowly but
steadily on its way to com biggrin.gif
I am loving this steep grades!
I hope you `ll employ good brakemen for your route!
The next days I`ll post a pic of horses and riders standing
around the Donnerpass.
They`re quite nice!

Best regards,

Christian

#86 laming

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Posted 03 August 2005 - 09:58 PM

Okay Christian:

Below you will find a pic of what I've accomplished tonight.

Bear in mind that the terrtex work has not yet begun. I plan to replace all roads with roads painted onto the terrtex. The existing roads are only placeholders laid in line with the prototype markers. Later, I'll use the roads as guides to paint the terrtex patches.

Attached Files



#87 chripsch

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Posted 04 August 2005 - 12:29 AM

Hi Andre!

Thanks for the pic! Is looking great! biggrin.gif Almost like at me at home where I
grew up between mountains, forests, meadows and cows...
You must know a sawmill was the first industry to see in my live as my
little community in the prealps don´t have great industries.
Seeing your pic I remember the days as a child when we went to
the sawmill in the neighbour-village to pick up the wood left over
as firewood.
The sawmills owner, a real bavarian "original" rode it all to our house with
his tractor and a trailer which tyres didn`t have one mm of profile lasting laugh.gif
A bit hazardous but the trailer still exists today with the same tyres!
I myself rebuilt yesterday a secondary highschool for our NG-project.

Best regards from Munich, Bavaria,

Christian

P.S: If you paint the roads directly on the terrex would there be a possibilty to
draw creeks or smaller rivers on it as there`s only a limited water-levels at MSTS
avilable???

#88 S. Weaver

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Posted 04 August 2005 - 12:14 PM

QUOTE(laming @ Aug 3 2005, 11:58 PM)
Below you will find a pic of what I've accomplished tonight.

Enticing, Andre.

Yesterday, I was straightening bent handbrake shafts on two flat cars. (Seems they always get in the way of the MOW crane boom.) Anyway, I was thinking of your Ozark hardwoods and the loads of flats that will be shipped out of a place like St. Paul ...

Keep us dreamin'.

#89 laming

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Posted 04 August 2005 - 04:07 PM

Christian said:

"Thanks for the pic!"

You're welcome. It's neat that a route depicting the Ozarks in the 1890's can rekindle fond memories of the Bavarian Alps in a fellow simmer half way around the world! This sim is amazing.

"(terrtex)...would there be a possibilty to draw creeks or smaller rivers on it...??"

Hopefully. I too, do NOT like the way MSTS handles water in a mountainous setting.


Steve said:

"Keep us dreamin'."

Well, since posting that, much more has been added to the above scene.

I was very pleasantly surprised at the effect experienced at St. Paul once in the sim. Quietly chuffing about the area did indeed give the impression of a booming timber economy. I've intentionally placed tall stacks of ties and timber up next to the tracks at every available loading space. Seeing all the ties and timber stacked everywhere definitely creates the feeling of "WOOD". Too bad I can't get the pungent smell of white oak sap into this sim. smile.gif

Oh, and you can bet that the switch jobs here will be very challenging!!

This just in:

While working in RE last night, a brainstorm hit me in regards to the Ozark Lines project that will likely follow this one. Sorry, it's top secret at this point. biggrin.gif

I'm having fun!

#90 EdavilleFan

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Posted 04 August 2005 - 05:02 PM

Hi Andre,

St. Paul is looking good, from an eagle's point of view! biggrin.gif

Glad to hear that you are having fun, instead of it turning into work.

Keep us posted!

Bob

#91 chripsch

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Posted 05 August 2005 - 01:02 AM

Hi Andre!

QUOTE
You're welcome. It's neat that a route depicting the Ozarks in the 1890's can rekindle fond memories of the Bavarian Alps in a fellow simmer half way around the world! This sim is amazing.


Seems that the world isn`t so big as everyone of us is thinking! biggrin.gif
I find it very amazing too, that the Ozarks at the other side of the world are giving me a feeling
almost of being at home.
Is just contrary to the wildwest-pics you get to see from the US as child.
The States are more than a dessert with some saloons in it.
The Ozarks are quite the type of Landscape I love from my childhood on biggrin.gif
Would be nice to find some waterpowered sawmills or mills with their huge wheels
in St. Paul wink.gif

Best regards from the other side of the big water,

Christian

#92 saddletank

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 04:08 AM

Hi Andre

This thread seems to have had a total change of direction since you started it, but you might like to read what floats my boat MSTS-wise.

I am not a railfan, I have almost no interest in real modern trains. I am a railroad modeller. My whole approach to MSTS is that it is the huge trainset I never had space for as a kid. I hardly ever drive from the cabview. I like to use the outside cameras and enjoy the scenery. I’m a scenery junkie.

I like a mixture of railroading work. Some days I like to dive into a big industrial complex or a yard with just a switcher and spend a couple of hours just moving cars about. Another day I like to take a short local run dropping off and picking up cars, maybe a switch move or two and see other trains at work along the line. And on some days I like to climb aboard a 6 engine lash up and haul 6000 tons of auto parts over a mountain.

But if I had to say what is my main interest it would be a local freight run: assembling the train at a yard, dropping off and picking up cuts along the line and putting the train to bed at the end of the day, maybe even a turn – out and back.

Time period: definitely the early to mid 1950s with a mixture of filthy old steamers on their last runs before the cutting torch comes along and the new and fascinating 1st generation diesels.

Geographical setting: absolutely not important. I’m happy driving the Maine Central or the San Diego and Arizona smile.gif. However if a commercial developer decided to make a route based on Bangor & Aroostook practice in the 50s I’d be customer No.1 smile.gif

Having said that, steam is woefully under-represented in the commercial market (and freeware come to that) so any steam route would work for me, regardless of the period set.

Type of terrain the route runs through: again not important although I prefer greenery and habitation to empty desert and wilderness: I need the occasional line-side human habitation and scenic detail to give interest. Difficult grades are always interesting but a route must not rely on them for it’s only feature of interest. I think generally I prefer rural or small-town America to urban scenery although the one-tile Sweethaven Harbor switching route by Ron Paludan was great – because it had bucketfuls of atmosphere.

Type of modelling: Not important. I find that 100% prototypical routes can in fact make quite boring drives. Fiction or semi-fiction I think can give a much more interesting combinations of towns, industries and terrain. I’m thinking Canton and Ohio here, although the NA and A&O work for me as well.

Important things for me are build quality and texture quality of models: both the locos and stock and the scenery. I like locos that look careworn and dirty and I am especially happy with a good cab and a good set of sounds. Route scenery should be consistent in quality and placement as well as the colour palette used – an overall effect is better than one or two scenes that stand out when the surrounding route is empty or sub-standard. Sadly, as you may recall from our exchange of e-mails on the NA during testing I’m not a fan of tree line flats placed close to the track, that really kills off immersion for me.

Clutter is good – junk, people, animals, lineside grasses, the small details do count. I don’t need animated scenery and other clever stuff, but the place must give the appearance of being a real living working environment.

Loco and stock physics must be as correct as is possible. I need to have reliable front coupler switching. It’s not hard to achieve as some developers have managed it and I have managed it on my route but the number of commercial developers who just don’t even bother looking at bounding boxes, coupler stats and so on is very frustrating.

But for me the thing that makes or breaks any route is the activities, and how well written, clever, complex or amusing they can be. I very much like yours and Rich G’s approach to activities where you the player become part of the railroad workforce and you can get to know the characters of the people you are working with. Canton was the best example of this, when it came out it was something totally new and fresh in the MSTS market. I keep going back to that route again and again, even though as a route I find the longish runs between the towns a bit boring, the action at the other points makes up for that. The presence of AI traffic is important, as a player I need to feel I’m on a working railroad and not alone.

Well, hope that helps.