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Armageddon.


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#21 pnrailway

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Posted 06 August 2004 - 05:31 AM

And the other one

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#22 pnrailway

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Posted 06 August 2004 - 05:38 AM

And there was an interesting station on the line the LNE shared with the SusieQ at Hainesberg.

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#23 laming

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Posted 06 August 2004 - 09:58 AM

Thanks much Paul for the efforts.

I have had those pics in my resource folders for some time now and have been using the Pen Argyl pic as I build Pen Argyl Yard. However, do not hesitate to post any pics you find or point me toward them for you never know whey you'll dig up something I don't have!

Thanks again.

Andre

#24 pnrailway

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Posted 07 August 2004 - 12:39 PM

Andre,

A question, I was over at the Railfan.net forum on the LNE, which I know you are a member of, and I noticed in one of the posts some information on the slate operations at Pen Argyl. Now I know the photo's were from the turn of the century and I am not sure how long the slate operations lasted there. I know that the slate operations on the Maryland & Pennsylvania lasted well into the 60's, and then some, so I was wondering if the slate operations might still have been going on in the era you will be depicting. If so, will they be a possible subject of one or more activities? blush.gif dry.gif wink.gif huh.gif

I also came across this time line, which I am sure you must have, but that may be of interest to others:
April 2, 1895 Lehigh & New England Railroad Company incorporated by new owners of what had been the Pennsylvania, Poughkeepsie & Boston Railroad.
January 1, 1897 LNE commences operation after the LV and NYS&W surrender respective leases acquired during receivership.
April 19, 1897 LNE charters Pochuck RR, a trackage-only system.
1902-1904 LNE expands its Lehigh Valley area trackage to include Wind Gap-Nazareth-Martins Creek, Bath-Christian Springs, and a branch in Johnsonville in Upper Mount Bethel Township.
May 9, 1904 Lehigh Coal & Navigation Co. gains control of the LNE.
1905 LNE abandons trackage between Benders and a point west of Wind Gap and incorporates Lehigh & Lackawanna Benders-Pen Argyl trackage into its main line.
1912 After completion of a yard at Maybrook NY, LNE trains commence and terminate at Maybrook.
July 24, 1912 Main line extension from Danielsville to Tamaqua opens, providing direct service to Lehigh Coal & Navigation Company's breakers.
December 14, 1913 Panther Creek RR acquired, adding trackage from Tamaqua through Coaldale and Lansford to Summit Hill.
1914 Lehigh Gap-Palmerton spur opens a connection between the LNE and Chestnut Ridge Railway Co.
April 1, 1914 Catasauqua branch opens.
1915 Hauto-Nesquehoning extension opens.
1918 LNE abandons trackage to Hower slate quarries.
1926-1928 LNE purchases two Brill gas-electric cars.
1927 Interstate Commerce Commission rejects Reading Company's plan to lease the LNE for 999 years.
1928-1935 Subsequent abandonments include Danielsville-Slatington, Wind Gap-Saylors Lake, Nazareth-Wind Gap, and part of Pochuck RR.
1937 Gas-electric car service discontinued, both cars sold to Southern New York Railway on December 14, 1939.
1940s During and after WW2, LNE abandons trackage at Hauto-Nesquehoning, Lansford-Summit Hill, remainder of Pochuck trackage, Pen Argyl-Wind Gap, Bangor branch, and Bangor-Johnsonville.
February 27, 1947 LNE purchases a 650-hp diesel locomotive from the U.S. Army, inaugurating dieselization.
December 20, 1949 LNE retires its last steam locomotives, completing dieselization.
1961 Declines in anthracite and cement shipments cause LNE to abandon or sell all rail lines and discontinue operations in New Jersey and New York. CNJ purchases Hauto-Tamaqua, Bethlehem-Bath-Nazareth-Martins Creek, and Allentown-Bethlehem trackage. EL purchases Pen Argyl-Wind Gap trackage.
October 31, 1961 LNE ceases operations

Paul

#25 laming

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Posted 07 August 2004 - 02:07 PM

It's my understanding that slate begin to be quickly phased out as truck shipment became more dependable. Slate was way too easy to damage in transit, thus much damage when shipped via rails. Further, as other roofing materials were developed, the slate industry continued to shrink.

This means a general downturn in slate production from about the 20's on, as well as generally meaning the phasing out of shipments of the remaining slate industry by the LNE during the 30's.

One more thing to add to the above list: The remainder of the Glenbrook Branch was shut down in 1946.

Amazing the finer points of things you learn when developing a route! smile.gif

Oh, fear not insofar as opportunities for activities... it will be more of a matter of "how much time do you want to spend living in the virtual world of the LNE??" blink.gif

Andre

#26 pnrailway

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Posted 07 August 2004 - 04:30 PM

Andre,

In looking through the pictures on some of the websites I came across today while doing some LNE research, I noticed one picture of Pen Argyl yard that showed how it was defiantly on the side of a hill with each track being a bit lower than the one next to it as it marched down the side of the hill. That must have been some construction project having to terrace the hill like that for the length of the of the yard along the side of the hill., almost like a set of bleachers. That is really going to present you with some nice problems as you lay it out.

Since the LNE was some distance north of me, and, while I knew of the line from articles like the one I sent you and Krause's book, I spent more time around the Maryland & Pennsylvania, as well as the B&O and Western Maryland. Th Ma&Pa as it was affectionately called was the railroad I was the most familiar with. It ran from Baltimore north to York, PA.

The M&PA had an area in it's 77 mile run that went through an area that, within just a couple of mile distance, had both marble quarries that quarried a green marble and slate quarries, plentiful enough that it was used as curbs that were about 3 inches thick and 8 inches high in the towns in the area. Eventually, as the roofing industry changed, while they continued to ship by rail, it went from being slab and cut slate to slate granules that are used on asphalt roof shingles. These were bagged and shipped in box cars, therefore breakage was no longer a problem. I didn't know if this also happened with the quarries in the LNE area or not. If so, they could become part of an activity or two. Trucks were always a problem, sort of the teamsters getting back at the trains for putting them out of the long haul business during horse and buggy days. tongue.gif

Whatever happens, I am looking forward to the release of the route and of running the railroad. I have already talked this morning to the computer person I will have build my new computer since the one I am using is actually a bit less of a machine than what you have right now. Since the LNE is a Must Have, then the new computer will be as well. rolleyes.gif wink.gif

Paul