Jump to content


Photo

OpenRails and A&M


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 billmoyer

billmoyer

    Brakeman

  • Valued Customer
  • PipPip
  • 64 posts
  • Location:Citrus Heights, CA

Posted 15 April 2012 - 07:40 PM

I recently installed the latest version of OR on my system. I just tried running the A&M, West Haul 2 and had quite a surprise. I realize the loads of rock to be picked up at the Junction are heavy but, I can't even push them back up the branch to hook up with the grain empties. Is the physics that different in OR? If so, is there a way for a person, who isn't comfortable getting into the program, to adjust the settings? Or, should I just modify the activity to run with three engines? Bill

#2 frog3764

frog3764

    Porter

  • Valued Customer
  • PipPip
  • 20 posts
  • Location:Cebu City, Philippines

Posted 16 April 2012 - 03:53 PM

I recently installed the latest version of OR on my system. I just tried running the A&M, West Haul 2 and had quite a surprise. I realize the loads of rock to be picked up at the Junction are heavy but, I can't even push them back up the branch to hook up with the grain empties. Is the physics that different in OR? If so, is there a way for a person, who isn't comfortable getting into the program, to adjust the settings? Or, should I just modify the activity to run with three engines?

Bill



Hey Bill - If I remember right, the physics on OR are only general and not "tuned" yet.

Jim

#3 longiron

longiron

    Railfan

  • Valued Customer
  • 2 posts

Posted 17 April 2012 - 11:15 AM

just caught this thread. The OpenRails v0.7 physics model is extremely accurate within the limitations of the MSTS ENG parameters. The results may be different than MSTS. Since MSTS was reasonably accurate, the two should be close. But where the big differences lie is when the physics parameters have been "adjusted" to unrealistic values to make MSTS performance like the real world.

What's different between the two?

First, OR uses the actual Davis equations for friction (i.e. resistance), not necessarily the Friction definition in the ENG file. This may make the train easier or harder to pull compared to MSTS depending on how accuarate the parameters in the Friction section are.

Two, the tractive effort and adhesion are accurately calculated, including wheel slip. check out the youtube vid: http://www.youtube.c...mp;feature=plcp

Third, OpenRails simulates the "loading" of a diesel electric locomotive, rather than the physics performance of an automobile, which MSTS better resembles.

As OpenRails introduces new parameters, this will make OpenRails physics even more accurate including traction motor temp degrading, tractive effort curves, phase transition for first generation diesels, parallel & series motor simulation and much more.

I have A&M, it's one of the core test routes for the OR team. Will give this activity a try over the weekend and report my results

#4 laming

laming

    Robber Baron

  • V Scale Creations
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,550 posts
  • Location:Poteau, OK, USA

Posted 17 April 2012 - 04:36 PM

I have A&M, it's one of the core test routes for the OR team. Will give this activity a try over the weekend and report my results


Yes, please do.

#5 wacampbell

wacampbell

    Brakeman

  • Valued Customer
  • PipPip
  • 64 posts

Posted 18 April 2012 - 06:37 PM

It sounds like you may not have connected the brake hoses. After you couple, hit the backslash key to connect the brake hose and wait for the train line to charge before trying pull away.

#6 billmoyer

billmoyer

    Brakeman

  • Valued Customer
  • PipPip
  • 64 posts
  • Location:Citrus Heights, CA

Posted 23 April 2012 - 07:16 AM

That was the answer. I overlooked the "advanced braking" portion of the quick start guide. :( :(


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users