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What Turns Your Crank? 9/7/11


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#21 spud

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Posted 17 September 2011 - 07:52 AM

QUOTE(walterconklin @ Sep 17 2011, 5:17 AM) View Post

Hi,

I have been following this forum for years now.

What Riverfront TOC are you referring to?

Thanks,
Walter


The one the dude in the picture is waiting on! tongue.gif
Sorry but I just could not resist that opening! rolleyes.gif
foof.gif

#22 laming

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Posted 18 September 2011 - 04:40 PM

Hi All!

Just got back from a weekend in Springfield, MO. I participated in a "Frisco Folks Convention". Was great to visit with old Frisco friends and in general kick back and relax. Sharon took a stack of books and (amid meals/etc) also relaxed in the hotel recliner and did her favorite thing: Read.

Glad you guys got a kick of out Herman's pic. I enjoy pulling his pic out and springing in on you all when appropriate!

Walter:

Scott was in reference to one of the two Turn Of the (19th) Century routes I was working on that was to include a river front scene and (I hoped) riverboats. Likely it was the Ozark Lines extension. In essence, I took the proto-lanced Ozark Northern and extended the rails to the prototype town of Ozark, AR to connect with the Iron Mountain & Southern. The prototype town of Ozark sits right against the Arkansas River. The prototype Iron Mountain & Southern (now the Union Pacific) runs right along the river front. Though I've not researched the history of the town of Ozark, I'm sure there was riverboat activity "back then".

Below you'll see a couple of pics taken in RE at Ozark depicting the rough track work and place holders for the town. (Work in the pic was accomplished a couple years ago?)

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#23 scottb613

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Posted 19 September 2011 - 12:50 PM

Hi Andre,

LOL - yeah - the riverfront idea with some steam boats really captured my imagination... If you ever get back to it - give me a ping... If we could find some plans - I'd try my hand at a contribution of some type of paddle wheeler...

Regards,
Scott

#24 laming

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Posted 19 September 2011 - 01:44 PM

Scott said...

QUOTE
...the riverfront idea with some steam boats really captured my imagination...


Well Scott, me boy, in one easy statement you've synthisized what that whole TOC thing does to me.

Seeing a neat TOC RR'ing photo, or reading a great TOC19 anecdote, etc, almost ALWAYS fires up my imagination. Truly a shame that route building is such hard work. There are so many great ideas I would love to pursue to completion. It is compelling, TOC19.

Further, TOC19 is SOOO much more accomodating to proto-lancing than the diesel era. There were small RR lines EVERYWHERE during the TOC19 era... so plausibility is much easier to attain!

However, having said all that, I will freely admit that the Classic Era of dieseling also appeals to me... very much. Problem with the Classic Era is finding a managable prototype subject that has the elements that I want. Proto-lancing is a bit more challenging during the diesel era. Very easy to get too cheesy. smile.gif

BUT....

I HAVE found a very interesting diesel prototype that I would be very tempted to pursue "one of these days". Upsides:

* Would lend itself to sequential construction.
* Equipment is already available.
* Offers some pretty tough mountain railroading.

The ability to be constructed sequentially would be a great help to me in getting a short segment completed, and out the door, then work on another segment as inclined.

A diesel project would offer me the ability to create those oily, grundgey diesel service scenes that I find so interesting, along with other elements of dieseldom I find interest in.

Below you'll see a pic taken of my "evaluation" work thereon.

HOWEVER...

Who knows?

Ooops... time's up. Time to go to work. (I'm on nights this week. sad.gif )


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#25 walterconklin

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Posted 04 October 2011 - 12:06 PM

QUOTE(laming @ Sep 19 2011, 4:25 PM) View Post

Scott said...



Well Scott, me boy, in one easy statement you've synthesized what that whole TOC thing does to me.

Seeing a neat TOC RR'ing photo, or reading a great TOC19 anecdote, etc, almost ALWAYS fires up my imagination. Truly a shame that route building is such hard work. There are so many great ideas I would love to pursue to completion. It is compelling, TOC19.

Further, TOC19 is SOOO much more accomodating to proto-lancing than the diesel era. There were small RR lines EVERYWHERE during the TOC19 era... so plausibility is much easier to attain!

However, having said all that, I will freely admit that the Classic Era of dieseling also appeals to me... very much. Problem with the Classic Era is finding a managable prototype subject that has the elements that I want. Proto-lancing is a bit more challenging during the diesel era. Very easy to get too cheesy. smile.gif

BUT....

I HAVE found a very interesting diesel prototype that I would be very tempted to pursue "one of these days". Upsides:

* Would lend itself to sequential construction.
* Equipment is already available.
* Offers some pretty tough mountain railroading.

The ability to be constructed sequentially would be a great help to me in getting a short segment completed, and out the door, then work on another segment as inclined.

A diesel project would offer me the ability to create those oily, grundgey diesel service scenes that I find so interesting, along with other elements of dieseldom I find interest in.

Below you'll see a pic taken of my "evaluation" work thereon.

HOWEVER...

Who knows?

Ooops... time's up. Time to go to work. (I'm on nights this week. sad.gif )


Hi Andre,

I admire your art in back abandoned lines back to life. Your routes are an inspiration.

Sincerely,
Walter

#26 laming

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 02:32 PM

Hi Walter!

Thanks for the kind words. It IS very enjoyable to bring a line back to life that's been gone for a number of years. No doubt, I seem to enjoy that aspect the most about MSTS.

That part of MSTS is almost a compulsion. That is, if I get interested in a line... it pretty much consumes me until I find where it went on USAPhotoMaps and/or Google Earth. And IF I can find it, I then trace it to its terminals or other point of interest. If I'm successful at tracing its right-of-way, typically I will then DEM the terrain and place markers so I can go into RE to get a "feel" for what the line was like and how it would translate into MSTS. Many times, track is laid! It's a sickness. biggrin.gif (FWIW: That's where I usually bog down: Once it's time to start populating all those tiles I added and all that track I laid on an "interesting" route!!!)

As for that compulsion thing, here's a classic example:

Last night I had a long and enjoyable phone chat with a long time friend that I originally met via railroading. He is now retired and currently lives in Pencil Bluffs, AR. Anyway, he was telling me about attending a "reunion" of sorts at a place called "Forester" Arkansas.

Forester was a sawmill town... a BIG sawmill town. It received rail service from the northwest and from the south. From the northwest, it was served by the Kansas City Southern's "Arkansas Western Branch". (Note: The Arkansas Western was originally a little line that ran from Heavener, OK to just past Waldron, AR. It was purchased by the KCS and eventually extended to Forester. The AW's reason for being was coal... lots of it... and timber products. Once in the town of Waldron, a variety of industries were served. The Heavener-Waldron portion of the AW survives to this day and sees a couple/three trains per week.)

However, it's the line from the SOUTH that REALLY piques my interest: The Caddo & Choctaw. The C&C was the railroad of the parent company, the Caddo River Lumber Company. The C&C had a mind boggling array of lines (almost) all throughout the heart of the Ouachita Mountains. Several large sawmills were owned/served, as well general freight for some of the towns along the way.

From what I learned from my friend, was the fact there was at least one major climb, and likely two. The one that is known is also known to have used helper service to get the loaded trains up and over Mauldin Mtn. The other helper grade should be over Blowout Mtn on the line to Forester. Loaded log trains were unidirectional on account of the various sawmills hither and yon that needed to be supplied. Thus loaded log trains could be headed north to Forester or south to Roseboro, etc! Further south, the Caddo & Choctaw connected with the Fort Smith & Gurdon. The FS&G eventually became a branch of the Iron Mountain & Southern, then Missouri Pacific. Portions of the C&C were purchased by the Memphis, Dallas & Gulf.

Anyway... I've "found" the abandoned portion of the AW from Waldron to Forester on the topos/photo maps... but for the life of me I cannot find any evidence of the Caddo & Choctaw leaving Forester! That's really bugging me. (That compulsion thing I mentioned.) In fact, USAPhotoMaps is open as I type this, and I am taking a short break from studying the elevation grids and trail traces/etc for tell tale signs of roadbed work. (i.e. cuts/fills, suspect radii curves, and such.)

Amazing how much railroading was around as one goes back in years!!! VERY likely, the above network of railroads could make a FASCINATING network of MSTS lines circa TOC19!

Like I've said: It's a shame routes are so time consuming to finish!!


#27 walterconklin

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Posted 12 October 2011 - 05:12 PM

Hi Andre,

I too like to explore old abandoned railroad lines. I like to explore these lines by either walking the lines in real life or exploring them thanks to modern technology such as Google Maps/Earth and Bing Aerial. I think I even am a tad addicted to comparing how places with a railroad theme look in real life, or, as is most often the case, how these locations once looked when the railroad was in existence. To give me a feel for a particular time and place, even though I grew up way past the Steam and Diesel period, I consult books, maps, and websites for historical information about the railroads and business that once existed in a particular location. There is a term for this field of study loosely called Industrial Archeology.

I credit you as sparking my interest in the Lehigh and New England because of your virtual representation of the actual route. The LNE was really a gem, traversing a beautiful bucolic region with formidable grades. Intriguing to me was that I read the railroad was quite profitable even when its owners abandoned the line in 1963. The owners saw the proverbial handwriting on the wall that the railroad could not compete against trucks.

I am having a field day exploring in the MSTS RE the LNE and the myriad other lines included in the route. For being in Oklahoma, you really captued the look of area in the LNE route. I hope to do justice in retelling the story of the LNE and its connecting railroads by bringing them back to life on a virtual level in Tristate_Rails.

Sincerely,
Walter

#28 laming

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 07:01 PM

Hi Walter!

Thank you again for the kind words concerning my efforts on the LNE route that I forwarded to you. It was a labor of love, for sure. Always thought the LNE was a class act right up until the end. I'm confident that you will eventually get it up and going, and released for any/all to enjoy.

I love the term "Industrial Archeology"! I reckon' that's what it is! I'm guilty: I'm an "Industrial Archeologist"!

BTW: The rails reached Forester on that exploratory route I mentioned in this thread. Was disappointed in the topography once there. Rather mild compared to other regional prototypes. It's a given that I love rails through rugged terrain. (To wit my StLNA and ON routes, the Colorado Midland, SLSF in the Ozarks, Colorado Central, etc, developmental/experimental routes!)

However, I'm toying with yet another new concept. I intend to start a new thread concerning.

Stay tuned!