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Crossovers In ScaleRail


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#1 NorthernElectric

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 03:46 PM

Are there any tutorials out there on how to install a double crossover (MT1 to MT2 and back) in ScaleRail? If so, can someone please point me in the right direction? Much appreciated.

#2 amtk775

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 04:26 PM

Do they have to cross each other?

#3 nat

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 06:40 AM

Do you mean like an X Crosssover? Or like a / \ Crossover?

#4 Hack

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 10:58 AM

The 10d turnouts can be connected without issue, while the 6d require a short 5_5m piece, and IIRC the 3d requires a 15_5m section. Cheers! Marc

#5 NorthernElectric

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 11:46 AM

...The 10d turnouts can be connected without issue...

Got it. Thank you.

#6 nat

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 04:59 PM

Actualy Hack, the 3d switches require a "005_3m" section.

#7 amtk775

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 06:20 PM

I think he would know his own ScaleRail?

#8 NorthernElectric

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 09:15 PM

Actualy Hack, the 3d switches require a "005_3m" section.

Actually, hate to burst your bubble - however - Mr. Nelson was correct.

I think he would know his own ScaleRail?

I agree. Again, thank you Mr. Nelson.

#9 nat

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 11:11 AM

I think he would know his own ScaleRail?


I agree too, but we all make mistakes.

Actually, hate to burst your bubble - however - Mr. Nelson was correct.
I agree. Again, thank you Mr. Nelson.




Actualy Felice, unless you were looking at the wrong thing, I was correct.

-Nathan

#10 NorthernElectric

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 12:09 PM

Normally I wouldn't waste my time doing this, but I'm so damn tired of people telling me how to do something. I'm working on this route because no one else has the balls to step and do it, PLEASE do not tell me how to do something that you won't do yourself.

In the process of doing this trailing point crossover, I laid down piece SR_2rStr_w_010m.s At the end of another 10 degree switch, and another 40 meter straight piece - a degree switch is 40 meters long.

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I laid two SR_1tSwt_w_m10dr_NS.s switches back to back (well, from the diverging end of the piece), thus creating the crossover, I then reversed the first process with another SR_2rStr_w_010m.s piece.

Posted Image
Before its asked, in the type of route I'm building trailing point switches are used, and facing point switches are rare, for safety reasons.

Posted Image

So, again what Marc said:

...The 10d turnouts can be connected without issue...

was correct. If you were talking about something else, then that's your loss. Marc told me what I needed to know.

Again, thank you Marc.

#11 amtk775

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 06:16 PM

Trailing point? Don't you have to be coming off one of the legs of the turnout to get a trailing point move?

#12 NorthernElectric

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Posted 02 October 2009 - 03:59 PM

Trailing point? Don't you have to be coming off one of the legs of the turnout to get a trailing point move?

No. In this type of railroad environment, you'd reverse into the switch. Why? To prevent head-on collisions. You don't need PTC to have common sense. Contact me off-list for more information.